History

 

2011
The WCC was founded as the Trans Continental Marconi Communications Corporation, in preparation for Was

teland Weekend in 2011.

The setup from Wasteland Weekend 2011

The setup from Wasteland Weekend 2011

There we used a car battery, a mobile radio and a home made antenna to communicate with other radio operators across North America. By voice communication, text chat and slow scan image transmission, using simple means in the California desert, we spoke to people as far east as Georgia, USA, as far north as Alberta, Canada and as far south as Costa Rica.

More importantly we opened the eyes of many young people to the world of amateur radio communications. Introducing them to the ability to talk to people in faraway places using simple tools, without access to the Internet, mains power or telephone lines in times of crisis was very rewarding.

The founding members of the WCC were Adam Kasper and Erik Lundin, both employed at a Southern California high tech startup. Erik has been involved with amateur radio since 2010 and has used it to contact people all over the globe with an array of home built antennas. They founded the group in order to introduce fans of the post apocalyptic fiction genre at Wasteland Weekend 2011 to emergency communications methods.

2012
In 2012 the WCC was registered with the FCC as the “Wasteland Communication Club” and granted the

Setup from the 2012 Dystopian Desert Weekend

Setup from the 2012 Dystopian Desert Weekend

call sign “K6WCC”. Members Erik N8MJK and Marie KJ6IRG visited the Dystopian Studio’s Desert Weekend 4 in the Southern California Desert. There, they made the first contact using the new call sign with Brian Ard K4ARD in Pensacola, Florida. Many other contacts were made during the limited available operating time at the event. Several people stopped by to check out the antenna and the radios, and a good effort was put into educating the other guests about amateur radio and its functions in emergency communications.

Later in 2012, the WCC participated for the first time as a club in the ARRL Field Day, an event drawing 35,000 radio operators across the USA and Canada. The WCC Field Day was run by members Erik N8MJK and Jacob KD5FEG, who worked together on Field Day 2011.

Sunrise at the WCC Field Day 2012 Site

Sunrise at the WCC Field Day 2012 Site

The event also saw the introduction of the WCC 017 mobile mast truck, newly outfitted with a telescoping mast. This allows us to put antennas from 14 to 40 feet above the ground anywhere we can reach by truck within 30 minutes of getting there.

A mountain top in the Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara was chosen as an operating site, and used with the kind permission of the Forest Service. 24 hours at the site put the K6WCC call sign into the hands of 550 new contacts across North America.

2013
The first event at the End of Days preenactment site “Uranium Springs” (near Holbrook in northeastern Arizona) was held in April 2013. The WCC made the long trek and built a permanent building similar to the WCC mobile HQ. This building featured a fully functional post office, which sent mail out from participants at the event.

The WCC building in Uranium Springs, Arizona.

The WCC building in Uranium Springs, Arizona.

In June, Field Day rolled around again. The WCC was represented once again on a Santa Barbara mountain and made over 700 contacts during the 24 hour event. This event marked the first use of a new antenna designed with the help of Alex K6VHF.

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